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Whose project is it anyway?

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Whose project is it anyway? Part 2   So why do publisher-led projects dominate these days?   Access to the end-user While the author has a deep knowledge of a particular user group and of classroom pedagogy, publishers have the resources to access a wide range of potential end users. Publishing a multi-level, multi-component course is an expensive business and it’s simply too much of a financial gamble to develop a course without comprehensive market input at a number of key stages. Hence the publisher-led approach.   The review process is not without it flaws: it is...

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Whose project is it anyway?

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Whose project is it anyway? Part 1   The term ‘publisher-led’ has cropped up quite frequently in conversations I’ve had at conferences and in social media discussions. This post is an attempt to outline definitions of the term and to investigate some of the criticisms sometimes levelled at publisher-led projects. My thanks go to the authors, editors and publishers (named and unnamed) who have kindly contributed their views to this post.   Definitions According to one editor, a ‘publisher-led’ project is one that is “conceived and created primarily by a publisher in response to a...

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How to deal with disruptive change in publishing

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  Last night, I took a trip up to Fleet Street, London, where BookMachine and Unite had arranged for a panel of expert speakers from the world of publishing to address the contentious issue of change. At the United We Publish III event, the panellists were: Richard Charkin, Executive Director of Bloomsbury Publishing Hazel Cushion, founder and Managing Director of Accent Press Tony Burke, Assistant General Secretary at Unite the Union Jacks Thomas, Director of the London Book Fair and John Pettigrew, founder of We Are Future Proofs. With such a diverse panel of experts, some of whom had...

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All wrapped up

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Or is it? This blog post is not all that it seems at first.  It isn’t about Christmas, for instance.  I don’t do Christmas on principle until we get to mid-December, which explains my idiosyncratic habit of wandering through stores with my eyes closed at the moment. It IS about packaging, however.  More specifically, it is about getting to the end of a packaging project and reflecting on its (mostly) ups and downs. Over the last few years, I’ve done a lot of project management on both print and digital products  and have written blogs about it.  But this is the first time that I’ve packaged...

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Room for improvement?

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Continued professional development is essential for all editorial freelancers. But is there room for a growth mindset in the publishing world? As Karen White observes in her recent blog post, we need to find and fund our own development opportunities.  CPD keeps our knowledge of techniques and trends fresh but equally importantly, it maintains our motivation. As many educational editors and writers are also teachers, we’re familiar with the concept that learning is a reward in itself. That sense of growth keeps what we’re doing interesting and in turn, makes us more interested in delivering...

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How to deliver a killer presentation

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The dust has finally settled after a very busy week of conferencing.  In the week that followed IATEFL, I had the opportunity to reflect on the content of some of the really useful talks I attended, (some of which have provided inspiration for future blog posts) and on the challenges that the presenters faced and overcame.  Presenting at IATEFL is a nerve-wracking experience.  It’s not just the potential for the technology to go wrong or for a well-informed member of the audience to ask you a difficult question, there’s also the challenge of compressing a great deal of detailed information...

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